Recent blog posts

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Climbers-resized-for-blog-photo.jpgBlog Post by Jim Jensen: Article by Rob Pizzie

My last two posts were an attempt to increase awareness of how decisions are made on a team, and to share some tools that can lead to better decisions. In the last post titled, Decision Making Process: Structured or not… I talked about the Levels of Decision Making model that we believe adds clarity and reduces unnecessary conflict in the decision-making process. Over the years that model has struck a chord with Rob Pizzie, one of three Managing Partners of the consulting firm Brizzey, and long-time client and friend of Crux Move. Rob’s article, For a Foot Soldier in War, represents his take on the value of identifying who’s making the decision. I hope you find it helpful.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Climbers-resized-for-blog-photo.jpgArticle by Jim Jensen

In my last post, “Is your team’s decision-making process a conscious one?” I mentioned that formal or structured decision-making processes resonate with some leaders and teams, and not with others. We teach a formal, structured decision-making process in our team development sessions, but in our experience it takes a few successful attempts at using it, on decisions that matter, before people truly see the value and begin to buy in. So rather than teach the process we use (which you would not likely buy into by just reading it) I’m choosing instead to share the components we feel should be part of any decision-making process.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Climbers-resized-for-blog-photo.jpgArticle by Jim Jensen:

Our work, being primarily with leadership teams, gives us many opportunities to explore the complexities of decision making.  In our experience, what complicates things the most is not that a team’s decision-making process is complex, but very often they simply do not have one, or their decision-making process is informal and often unconscious.  In other words, it is littered with opportunities for miscommunication and unchecked assumptions.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Climbers-resized-for-blog-photo.jpgBlog Post by Jim Jensen 

Have you noticed the concept of humility coming up in the literature lately? In The Ideal Team Player, Patrick Lencioni describes how being humble, hungry and smart (people smarts) are the three virtues of the ideal team player. He describes humility as "… the single greatest and most indispensable attribute of being a team player." Sounds intriguing, don't you think?

Edward Hess, author of Humility is the New Smart: Rethinking Human Excellence in the Smart Machine Age, discusses his take on the importance of humility in this podcast. He talks about how now, more than ever, people need to hone their skills in areas of emotional intelligence and working collaboratively with others. Give it a listen: Why Smart Machines Will Boost Emotional Intelligence

The writings of both these authors resonate with us and are consistent with our own experiences over the years of working with leaders and leadership teams.

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a1sx2_Thumbnail1_Climbers-resized-for-facebook-cover-1.jpgArticle by Jim Jensen

In my last post (Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team: Accountability = Support?) I talked about the potential value of reframing holding someone accountable as providing support, and how having that shared definition and mindset can make that critical behavior for building cohesive teams more likely to happen.

Imagine that your leadership team has built enough trust that team members can open up about their potential strengths and blind spots. Imagine too, that you’ve all been able to give and receive supportive feedback around strengths and blind spots and their impact.  Now imagine that you’ve all truly given each other permission to provide “accountability support”. If you haven’t quit reading by now, I’m assuming you would think that that’s a good vision. Yet even with that shared definition, and even with permission, it can still be challenging.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Climbers-resized-for-blog-photo.jpgArticle by Jim Jensen...

Are Accountability and Support the Same Thing? We believe they are. Or at least in the context of effective teaming they certainly can be.

Crux Move Consulting became an authorized partner provider of The Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team™ when the program was first launched last year (2014). We had been using the pyramid model from The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, by Patrick Lencioni, since the book came out in 2002, so we were excited to explore the process that is based on the model. It’s all good stuff; it gives us another avenue to extend the work that we have done with leadership teams for years, and will help us, help them to get more specific on how to ensure that they are functioning effectively and achieving their shared goals. 

Accountability is the fourth of the five behaviors of a cohesive team. In the context of teamwork, Lencioni defines accountability as the willingness of team members to call their peers on performance or behaviors that hurt the team, or that seem counterproductive to the good of the team. For those of you who have read the original book and perhaps his more recent book, The Advantage - Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business, we’d like to share our spin on accountability. According to Lencioni, even once there is a fairly solid level of trust on a leadership team, and once they are able to engage in healthy conflict and passionate debate, and are thus able to get true commitment and buy-in, holding one another accountable is still incredibly challenging. He says that of all five behaviors it’s the hardest one for teams to embrace, and that getting people to hold one another accountable is by far the most difficult part of forming a cohesive team. 

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Climbers-resized-for-blog-photo.jpgCrux Move Consulting is Now an Authorized Partner Provider of The Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team™ from Wiley

Kalamazoo, Michigan, July 31, 2014 – Crux Move Consulting is now among an exclusive group of independent facilitators, coaches, and consultants authorized to provide The Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team™ to their clients, after successfully completing the required application, authorization, and training process.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Climbers-resized-for-blog-photo.jpgCrux Move is excited to announce our partnership with Brizzey, a team of industry professionals with deep experience in clinical supply chain strategy and operations and a track record of driving change and process improvements, while maintaining operational performance.  We’re excited that the partnership between Crux Move and Brizzey and will bring together an unprecedented combination of skills and experience to holistically address the people, partnership and process elements of your organizational change initiatives.  Read more: “Crux Move Partnerships

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Climbers-resized-for-blog-photo.jpgBlog Post by Jim Jensen

“… this result from hundreds of thousands of leaders taking the Leadership Practices Inventory is entirely unsurprising. THE question with the lowest average score, asks people to rate the leader on whether he or she “Asks for feedback on how his or her actions affect other people’s performance.”  Dan Mulhern, in his most recent Reading for Leading article, “What They Forgot to Tell Bosses, but Bosses Need to Know” goes on to say, “But because positional authorities impact everyone in their shop, they need to get feedback more than they need to give it.”

Dan's article is a great reinforcement and follow-up to our most recent posts on the art of receiving feedback, parts 1 & 2. I hope you find it valuable.

Click here to read Dan's article, "What They Forgot to Tell Bosses, but Bosses Need to Know"

Click here if you liked this post and would like to read more

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Climbers-resized-for-blog-photo.jpg Article by Jim Jensen...

In Part 1 of Practical Tips on the Art of Receiving Feedback, or The Critical First Steps is Not Enough, I discussed the art of asking for feedback and how what you do, say or even think immediately after someone takes the risk to share their perceptions with you is even more important than the asking.  I pointed out five negative reactions you can exhibit which will guarantee that your people will likely never provide their feedback again: 1. immediately disagree; 2. don’t say anything at all; 3. rationalize or justify your behavior; 4. get angry; and 5. turn it back onto them as if they are at fault.

On a more positive note, here are six things you can do to make it more likely that people will trust you and your leadership enough to share their perceptions and give you ongoing support:

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Climbers-resized-for-blog-photo.jpgArticle by Jim Jensen...

Neil Armstrong’s small step for man and giant leap for mankind may not have taken on the same significance had he climbed right back into the lunar module and gone home. It was subsequent steps that made that historic journey complete. Yet clearly, that first step was critical and necessary in order for the journey to continue.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Climbers-resized-for-blog-photo.jpgBlog Post by Michael Srodes…

What if you know in your gut that a healthier work environment could make your company more successful, but culture change is not a priority for your top leadership?  There are as many cultures in an organization as there are leaders and teams. Here’s a link to a brief article that may inspire you to impact the culture that you have control of as well as those that you touch.   What if making the environment better isn't a goal of your leaders?

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Climbers-resized-for-blog-photo.jpgPosted by Jim Jensen…

I thought I’d include this article as a follow up to our recent post on the Victim/Warrior Model. The article supports the model and adds some cool depth to the upper part of the cycle, specifically on taking ownership. It comes from Dan Mulhern’s, Reading for Leading series. What struck me was Dan’s description of how a relationship can end up in a better place, because of having gone through a challenging interaction together, John Haidt’s poetic descriptions of the challenge of seeing our own faults, and of the internal reward that comes from successfully searching for and finding “your part”.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_Climbers-resized-for-blog-photo.jpgArticle by Jim Jensen…

 

John, VP of Quality, and Sue, VP of Engineering (Insert names, roles and situations from your organization) were in their weekly Monday-morning leadership team meeting. John has been getting a lot of pressure lately to prove the effectiveness of a critical project that he oversees, a project that has been consuming a great deal of resources. During the meeting John talked with Sue about some critical information he needed from Engineering, and he left the meeting with the understanding that Sue would get some data to him by Thursday.

Thursday came and went and nothing from Sue. Not a word! At the end of the day John was talking to Martin, another leadership team member. Martin had just spoken with Sue who made a commitment to get Martin some data that he needed before the weekend. John considered Martin’s needs as far less critical and was amazed that Sue was giving it priority over his project.

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Article by: Michael Srodes

Let me share an example of what I was talking about in my last post. My hope is to inspire a vision for your leadership team or organization regarding the power of leadership to create a culture that improves engagement, speed and results.

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Article by: Michael Srodes
 
What is the one thing in your workplace that impacts everything else?  Your company has only one but each team can have their own!  It makes it harder for some companies to survive while it makes other companies better.  Whether people are doing good or bad, they are always contributing to it and they don’t even have to know it.  Every employee keeps it going and has the power to change it, and leaders usually have more influence over it than everyone else.  It’s a little like the wind in that you can’t see it, but you can see the impact of it.

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Hello Leaders and Crux friends!a1sx2_Thumbnail1_Climbers-resized-for-facebook-cover-1.jpg

We have been thinking about leadership and conflict lately. It has always been right in the middle of all of our work with leaders and teams. It can mean missed business opportunities and added waste, raised costs, and increased stress. While many leaders work to minimize it, avoid it, or control it, in fact, conflict is a strong indicator of health and the amount of trust across a team...

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YarrowLocated in Augusta, Michigan, a short drive from Ann Arbor, Lansing, Grand Rapids and Kalamazoo and midway between Detroit and Chicago, Yarrow is the home site for our Michigan based corporate leadership development training programs and corporate team development training programs. Through our partnership with Yarrow we are able to offer what is arguably the best experiential adventure training process and the finest executive retreat facility combination in the Midwest. What makes Yarrow the ideal resort for Crux Move’s training programs?

For more information on Michigan Corporate Leadership Development and Team Building Training Programs visit our Program Locations page or visit www.yarrowgolf.com more information on Yarrow.

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Crystal Springs ResortCrux Move began a partnership with Crystal Springs Resort in October of 2011. Located in the rolling hills and farmland of the Garden State’s picturesque northwest and less than sixty miles from Manhattan and Newark Airport this beautiful resort is the perfect location to host our corporate leadership development training programs and corporate team building training programs for clients from New Jersey and New York.

For more information on New Jersey Corporate Leadership Development and Team Building Training Programs visit our Program Locations page or visit www.crystalgolfresort.com more information on Crystal Springs Resort.

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Crux Move began a partnership with Temecula Creek Inn in March of 2012. Located in Temecula, California, inland from the scenic Southern California coast and in the heart of Southern California’s wine country, Temecula Creek Inn plays host to Crux Move’s newest experiential training site. It is the perfect location to host our corporate leadership development training programs and corporate team building training programs in Southern California. Temecula is located in San Diego County, midway between San Diego and Los Angeles, California.

For more information on Southern California Corporate Leadership Development and Team Building Training Programs visit our Program Locations page or visit www.temeculacreekinn.com more information on Temecula Creek Inn.

 

 

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Crux Move is an authorized partner provider of The Five Behaviors of a Cohesive Team™

Click Here to learn more...

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and Everything DiSC™

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With more than 50 years of combined experience in Leadership and Team Development, Crux Move Consulting has amassed a list of well satisfied clients.

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